Iceland | Cheap flight tickets & Information


There are currently 13 active airports in Iceland. Below you can see the cheapest flights found in the last 6 hours.

Flight tickets (one way) United Kingdom ➔ Iceland

Manchester Reykjavik Keflavik
21 April 2024
MAN
MAN
direct
KEF
KEF
easyJet
easyJet
London Gatwick Akureyri
16 November 2024
LGW
LGW
direct
AEY
AEY
easyJet
easyJet
London Gatwick Reykjavik Keflavik
11 April 2024
LGW
LGW
stops
KEF
KEF
Wizz Air Malta
Wizz Air Malta + ...
More flight deals

Flight tickets (one way) Iceland ➔

Reykjavik Keflavik Edinburgh
04 May 2024
KEF
KEF
direct
EDI
EDI
easyJet
easyJet
Reykjavik Keflavik Milan Malpensa
24 May 2024
KEF
KEF
direct
MXP
MXP
Wizz Air Malta
Wizz Air Malta
Reykjavik Keflavik Oslo Gardermoen
16 April 2024
KEF
KEF
direct
OSL
OSL
Norwegian
Norwegian
More flight deals

Iceland (Icelandic: Ísland, pronounced [ˈistlant] ) is a Nordic island country between the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between North America and Europe. It is linked culturally and politically with Europe and is the region's most sparsely populated country. Its capital and largest city is Reykjavík, which is home to about 36% of the country's roughly 380,000 residents. The official language of the country is Icelandic.

Located on a rift between tectonic pl…
Iceland (Icelandic: Ísland, pronounced [ˈistlant] ) is a Nordic island country between the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between North America and Europe. It is linked culturally and politically with Europe and is the region's most sparsely populated country. Its capital and largest city is Reykjavík, which is home to about 36% of the country's roughly 380,000 residents. The official language of the country is Icelandic.

Located on a rift between tectonic plates, Iceland's geologic activity includes geysers and frequent volcanic eruptions. The interior consists of a volcanic plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains, and glaciers, and many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate, despite a latitude just south of the Arctic Circle. Its high latitude and marine influence keep summers chilly, and most of its islands have a polar climate.

According to the ancient manuscript Landnámabók, the settlement of Iceland began in 874 AD when the Norwegian chieftain Ingólfr Arnarson became the first permanent settler on the island. In the following centuries, Norwegians, and to a lesser extent other Scandinavians, immigrated to Iceland, bringing with them thralls (i.e., slaves or serfs) of Gaelic origin.

The island was governed as an independent commonwealth under the native parliament, the Althing, one of the world's oldest functioning legislative assemblies. Following a period of civil strife, Iceland acceded to Norwegian rule in the 13th century. In 1397, Iceland followed Norway's integration into the Kalmar Union along with the kingdoms of Denmark and Sweden, coming under de facto Danish rule following its dissolution in 1523. The Danish kingdom introduced Lutheranism by force in 1550, and Iceland was formally ceded to Denmark in 1814 by the Treaty of Kiel.

Influenced by ideals of nationalism after the French Revolution, Iceland's struggle for independence took form and culminated in the Danish–Icelandic Act of Union in 1918, with the establishment of the Kingdom of Iceland, sharing through a personal union the incumbent monarch of Denmark. During the occupation of Denmark in World War II, Iceland voted overwhelmingly to become a republic in 1944, thus ending the remaining formal ties with Denmark. Although the Althing was suspended from 1799 to 1845, the island republic nevertheless holds a claim to sustaining one of the longest-running parliaments in the world.

Until the 20th century, Iceland relied largely on subsistence fishing and agriculture. Industrialization of the fisheries and Marshall Plan aid following World War II brought prosperity, and Iceland became one of the wealthiest and most developed nations in the world. It became a part of the European Economic Area in 1994; this further diversified the economy into sectors such as finance, biotechnology, and manufacturing.

Iceland has a market economy with relatively low taxes, compared to other OECD countries, as well as the highest trade union membership in the world. It maintains a Nordic social welfare system that provides universal health care and tertiary education for its citizens. Iceland ranks highly in international comparisons of national performance, such as quality of life, education, protection of civil liberties, government transparency, and economic freedom. Iceland has the smallest population of any NATO member and is the only one with no standing army, possessing only a lightly armed coast guard.

Average prices in Iceland

White bread (500kg) 3.07 €
Chicken fillets (1kg) 16.36 €
Water (1,5l) 1.88 €
Domestic beer (0.5l) 2.84 €
Wine bottle 17.33 €

Meal (1 person) 16.35 €
McMeal (McDonald's) 13.73 €
Domestic beer (0.5l) 8.50 €
Cappuccino 4.17 €
Water (0.33l) 1.89 €

One-way ticket 3.60 €
Taxi start 4.77 €
Taxi (1km) 1.98 €
Taxi (1h waiting) 61.22 €
Gasoline (1l) 2.06 €

Apartment (1 bedroom) 1,259.92 €
Apartment (3 bedrooms) 1,857.80 €

Basic (electricity, heating, water, garbage) 96.34 €
Mobile phone monthly plan 20.52 €
Internet (60 mbps) 61.00 €

1 m2 (outside of centre) 4,143.81 €

Average Monthly Net Salary 3,805.85 €
Mortgage Interest Rate 7.08

The prices are calculated as average for all cities in Iceland
The prices are updated from numbeo.com

Hotels in Iceland
Hotels | Iceland

Countries near - Iceland

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